July252014
2srooky:

contra-indication:

sramister:

Our Band director wasn’t at school.

what is it about band kids everywhere that, when left alone, we all do the same thing and build forts, thrones, and barricades in the band room?

Because you’re fucking nerds.

2srooky:

contra-indication:

sramister:

Our Band director wasn’t at school.

what is it about band kids everywhere that, when left alone, we all do the same thing and build forts, thrones, and barricades in the band room?

Because you’re fucking nerds.

(via the-deer-penis-experience)

3PM
punkrockluna:

i always love this part because it means that maleficent had to be like “haha ok i’m gonna cover her with my cape and when they go WHERE IS SHE i’ll be like BOOM TADA”

punkrockluna:

i always love this part because it means that maleficent had to be like “haha ok i’m gonna cover her with my cape and when they go WHERE IS SHE i’ll be like BOOM TADA”

(Source: diabolicaldisney, via dreamsdelirium)

1PM
orgasmictipsforgirls:

silencegotblownapart:

s3x-addicti0n:

i-am-sherlockedx:

this gif should be seen by all

I am always going to reblog this it makes me die of laughter every time

Oh god so accurate

too perfect!

orgasmictipsforgirls:

silencegotblownapart:

s3x-addicti0n:

i-am-sherlockedx:

this gif should be seen by all

I am always going to reblog this it makes me die of laughter every time

Oh god so accurate

too perfect!

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via sexygyarados)

10AM
academicatheism:

When Beliefs and Facts Collide
Do Americans understand the scientific consensus about issues like climate change and evolution?
At least for a substantial portion of the public, it seems like the answer is no. The Pew Research Center, for instance, found that 33 percent of the publicbelieves “Humans and other living things have existed in their present form since the beginning of time” and 26 percent think there is not “solid evidence that the average temperature on Earth has been getting warmer over the past few decades.” Unsurprisingly, beliefs on both topics are divided along religious and partisan lines. For instance, 46 percent of Republicans said there is not solid evidence of global warming, compared with 11 percent of Democrats.
Continue Reading

academicatheism:

When Beliefs and Facts Collide

Do Americans understand the scientific consensus about issues like climate change and evolution?

At least for a substantial portion of the public, it seems like the answer is no. The Pew Research Center, for instance, found that 33 percent of the publicbelieves “Humans and other living things have existed in their present form since the beginning of time” and 26 percent think there is not “solid evidence that the average temperature on Earth has been getting warmer over the past few decades.” Unsurprisingly, beliefs on both topics are divided along religious and partisan lines. For instance, 46 percent of Republicans said there is not solid evidence of global warming, compared with 11 percent of Democrats.

Continue Reading

(via valeron42)

8AM

Anonymous said: I don't whether or not you received your answer about complementing a hijab (scarf) but yes you can complement a persons hijab. There isn't anyway that should bring offense to that person, I hope this helped. :) And sorry if someone already answered your question.

Cool thank you.  I already received some answers, but more input is always reassuring.

8AM

misha-mosha-masha:

THIS SHOW IS COMEDY GOLD AND IF YOU DON’T THINK SO YOU NEED TO REEVALUATE YOUR LIFE

(Source: winterforlovers, via arya-holmes)

6AM
4AM

jesus-lizard-journal:

>Using telekinisis to steal a juicy looking mammoth snout from a market stall
>turn to toss it out of sight for easy stealing
>smack a guard in the face with it
>get arrested
>go to jail
image

11/10 best elder scroll.

(via fightingscholarlykrogan)

2AM

tooquirkytolose:

 

wv-pm:

kukimao:

ponett:

you ever notice how the ponies don’t really look like horses much at all. specifically the head structure

i mean they’re ADORABLE and i love the designs but i mean

image

image

image

Just imagine.

imagethis could stop bronies

(via lightandwinged)

July242014

jtotheizzoe:

Doodling the Right Thing

With a few humble doodles, I think Google may have created the most widely-seen, and perhaps the most influential, science communication effort on Earth. Their series of Google search page tributes to female scientists (a few of which I’ve shared above) is a huge win for showcasing the efforts of women in science, which, unless you’ve been living under a very patriarchal rock for the past forever, you know is something the world needs very badly. 

It might seem silly to be talking about a picture like this, but we’re dealing with the Times Square billboard of internet graphics here. Every day, 730 million people visit Google.com a total of 17 billion times. Billion. Granted, not all of them see the same Google doodle, as only a small set of them are “global” doodles, but even if just 10% of daily unique visitors see a particular doodle, and just 10% of those people take the time to figure out who/what they’re looking at, that means 7+ million people a day (and that doesn’t even take into account repeated visits). I suspect that’s a low estimate, too, although I base that on nothing except my own optimism.

For comparison, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey drew just over 3 million U.S. viewers for its final episode. I’ll concede that’s not really a fair comparison, since Cosmos is a highly-produced, hour-long scripted TV series with very broad and lofty goals and a Google doodle is, well, a picture on the internet. The point I’m trying to make is not that Cosmos is less influential than a cartoon, because that’s ridiculous (although I must admit the more I think about it, I really don’t know how ridiculous it is). My point is that a Google doodle about science reaches a metric f**kton of people.

I am having a hard time thinking of another single Internet Thing that has the potential to reach so many people in a single day. No meme-filled Facebook page or educational YouTube channel comes close, and I don’t suspect any traditional science news/media sites are even in the ballpark. 

Google still has a long way to go to bring their doodle gender representation anywhere close to level. According to SPARK, only 17% of doodles between 2001-2013 were women (and 74% of them were white people). I can’t find the numbers, but on the bright side it seems like 2014 has showcased a high percentage of women in the doodles. In addition to monitoring women featured in doodles, the blog Speaking Up For Us keeps a running list of doodle-worthy women.Despite that remaining imbalance, I think this is an incredible effort on the part of Google, and we should demand even more doodles of underrepresented groups (both in science and beyond).

Can something so passive make any difference? To be honest, I don’t know, but I suspect that it does. When people only see one type of person recognized for accomplishing the Great Scientific Things of history, they consciously and subconsciously assume that only that type of person actually accomplishes Great Scientific Things. That is how underrepresented people stay underrepresented, which is the opposite thing we want to happen.

Google doodles aren’t going to cure cancer or send a human to Mars, but they just might help inspire the person who does. Not bad for a drawing.

(via dizzykins7)

7PM
5PM
“In a recent BBC report on homosexual Muslims in the UK, one interviewee described an experience she had at a gay pride rally. She says, “‘There was an occasion at gay pride once where one of the marchers turned around and quite crudely said, ‘we didn’t know pride was allowing suicide bombers on the march’ –– it was really shocking to hear it from a fellow gay marcher.” The intersection of an affirmative declaration of gay and Muslim identifications runs into the ascriptive identification of all Muslims as terrorists.” Hussein Rashid, The Name Game: Understanding Tensions in Identity and Muslim Homosexuality, in Muslim LGBT Inclusion Project (via ace-muslim)

(via 101st-analborne)

3PM

lightspeedsound:

Bethann Hardison on racism in the fashion industry.

From About Face: Supermodels then and now

(via mutantcanuck)

eww racism 

1PM
10AM
lolatprolife:

tomwaitsforme:

This is something the brilliant artist Nuria Tamarit illustrated about abortion.
It’s the Spanish of “I decide and you keep quiet.”

I actually really dig this. 
"If you want to decide what happens to this pregnancy YOU can fucking take care of it!" - Rachel

lolatprolife:

tomwaitsforme:

This is something the brilliant artist Nuria Tamarit illustrated about abortion.

It’s the Spanish of “I decide and you keep quiet.”

I actually really dig this. 

"If you want to decide what happens to this pregnancy YOU can fucking take care of it!" - Rachel

(via protego-et-servio)

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