April172014
science-junkie:

Why Are We Still Shouting About GMOs?

Why is it so hard for scientists and the public to agree about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture? Proponents argue that tweaking a crop’s DNA can increase nutritional value, pest resistance, or yield to help feed the world’s growing population. But many remain vehemently opposed to the technology. Some fear that big businesses like Monsanto will monopolize the agricultural industry by claiming intellectual property rights over GM crops. Others aren’t convinced that GMOs are safe to eat.
Philosopher of science Daniel Hicks of Western University in London, Canada, has studied how sociopolitical and ethical concerns—for example, fears about abuse of intellectual property rights—get mixed up with the technical questions about food safety in the GMO debate. His current research seeks to document how people on either side of the controversy collect and use evidence about the claim that GMOs increase crop yields. He presented a poster titled “Why is the GMO debate so intractable?” here at the annual meeting of AAAS, which publishes Science. Hicks sat down with Science to answer a few questions about the GMO debate. 
Read more (via sciencemag.org)

Who is interested to dig deeper into the issue, I suggest the special that Nature did in 2013 for the thirty years since the introduction of the first transgenic plant.

science-junkie:

Why Are We Still Shouting About GMOs?

Why is it so hard for scientists and the public to agree about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture? Proponents argue that tweaking a crop’s DNA can increase nutritional value, pest resistance, or yield to help feed the world’s growing population. But many remain vehemently opposed to the technology. Some fear that big businesses like Monsanto will monopolize the agricultural industry by claiming intellectual property rights over GM crops. Others aren’t convinced that GMOs are safe to eat.

Philosopher of science Daniel Hicks of Western University in London, Canada, has studied how sociopolitical and ethical concerns—for example, fears about abuse of intellectual property rights—get mixed up with the technical questions about food safety in the GMO debate. His current research seeks to document how people on either side of the controversy collect and use evidence about the claim that GMOs increase crop yields. He presented a poster titled “Why is the GMO debate so intractable?” here at the annual meeting of AAAS, which publishes Science. Hicks sat down with Science to answer a few questions about the GMO debate. 

Read more (via sciencemag.org)

Who is interested to dig deeper into the issue, I suggest the special that Nature did in 2013 for the thirty years since the introduction of the first transgenic plant.

(via supervaca)

9AM

jicheshire:

thestonemask:

*aggressively collects money in a video game*

*never buys anything with it*

it’s like some kind of sick security from not having real life money

it just feels so good

(via supervaca)

9AM
gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.


And cheetahs are basically clones of eachother anymore.

gryphknight:

bethelionqueen:

eevee-the-evolutionist:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

This is making me really sad

Holy shit I didn’t realize there were that few tigers

PROTECT BIG CATS AT ALL COST

I remember seeing a documentary some time ago about declining tiger populations.  Although I can’t remember the name of it (or the network), I did find this link which includes lack of prey animals, shrinking habitats, and extremely compromised genetic diversity among the major causes.

And cheetahs are basically clones of eachother anymore.

(Source: , via arya-holmes)

8AM

anogoodrabblerouser:

Being fat is an evolutionary advantage because a leopard is less likely to be able to drag you up a tree.

8AM

I made a dozen banana muffins last night and I didn’t even eat any.  Then those assholes I live with ate all but one.  I finally got one and now I understand.  These are fucking delicious.  People should be trading sexual favors for my muffins.

7AM
cocastiel:

mellro:

edwardspoonhands:

karenhallion:

miss-nobody13:

itsprongs:

Oh god guys. JK Rowling is a genius, and so is this person.

the thing I love about this fandom is that there are 7 books and 8 movies to observe. so every once in a while some blessed soul finds a piece of information that makes all the magic resurface again

Mind. Blown. 

Oh Lord…it’s a metaphor too. It’s symbolic of Neville holding on to his past, the horrors of what happened to his parents, of being a passive vessel for that atrocity. As if the terrible thing kept happening and would never stop happening. 
When he moves forward and becomes part of his own story instead of the story of his past, his strength surges. 



TEAM NEVILLE FOR LIFE

It also shows that if you give a kid the wrong tool, he may be a genius but he’s never going to be able to build something with it.

cocastiel:

mellro:

edwardspoonhands:

karenhallion:

miss-nobody13:

itsprongs:

Oh god guys. JK Rowling is a genius, and so is this person.

the thing I love about this fandom is that there are 7 books and 8 movies to observe. so every once in a while some blessed soul finds a piece of information that makes all the magic resurface again

Mind. Blown. 

Oh Lord…it’s a metaphor too. It’s symbolic of Neville holding on to his past, the horrors of what happened to his parents, of being a passive vessel for that atrocity. As if the terrible thing kept happening and would never stop happening. 

When he moves forward and becomes part of his own story instead of the story of his past, his strength surges. 

TEAM NEVILLE FOR LIFE

It also shows that if you give a kid the wrong tool, he may be a genius but he’s never going to be able to build something with it.

(via ajubilatedlee)

6AM
4AM

(via kommgehwech)

3AM
1AM
cute-overload:

Time for a goofy friend pic!http://cute-overload.tumblr.com

cute-overload:

Time for a goofy friend pic!
http://cute-overload.tumblr.com

April162014
“It never ceases to amaze me that every second of every day, more than 6,000 billion neutrinos coming from nuclear reactions inside the sun whiz through my body, almost all of which will travel right through the earth without interruption.” Lawrence Krauss (via rorschachx)

(via biowiiner)

9PM
7PM

(Source: chirex, via wewillnotgoquietly)

6PM
disney-universes:

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

Man, don’t you just wish Atlantis took off as a sci-fi franchise for Disney just so all that world building they did between this and Subterranean Tours could have found more use?

disney-universes:

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

Man, don’t you just wish Atlantis took off as a sci-fi franchise for Disney just so all that world building they did between this and Subterranean Tours could have found more use?

(via mutantcanuck)

Disney 

4PM
← Older entries Page 1 of 610