August272014

scratchingpad:

Why Declawing is a Bad Idea (An 1-minute guide)

More about declawing:

Paw Project (awesome documentary on declawing) 
http://www.pawproject.org/

Humane Society’s stance on declawing
http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/cats/tips/declawing.html

Specific complications of declawing:
http://pictures-of-cats.org/complications-of-declawing.html

Alternatives to declawing:
http://www.catscratching.com/

Behavioral products:

Sticky paws (furniture scratch deterrent)
http://www.pioneerpet.com/behavioral/sticky-paws/

Soft paws (nail caps)
http://www.softpaws.com/

Big thanks to Diane Kang who popped out of NYU to draw cats for me.

(via lettuceiscurrentlyinmyasshole)

4AM

sylveonslove:

shinypokemonlab:

geek-studio:

If Pokemon Was Made for iPhone [X]

This is a goddamn nightmare.

Hey look I found Hell

(via persephoneholly)

2AM
badsciencejokes:

No one understands…

badsciencejokes:

No one understands…

(Source: monkeyrubster, via supervaca)

August262014
badsciencejokes:

You can’t escape from a trainer battle!

badsciencejokes:

You can’t escape from a trainer battle!

(Source: agathe-nougat, via supervaca)

9PM

Captain’s Log.
Stardate 68118.

I have found it less degrading to deal with my puppy constantly following me around by considering her my “away team”.

The away team recently aided a mission by growling at the possibility hostile terrestrial shellfish I fed, and even managed to collect a sample of fabric apparently intended to enclose humanoid feet.

The away team then required scratchies and kissies. The away team is a good girl. Such a good girl.

8PM

Currently hiding in the computer room because my bf needs to make the dog listen to him. All she wants to do is follow mommy.

7PM

nowtrytherest:

Just remember: even if you can’t slay dragons and shoot fireballs from your hands, you can step over small objects in your path, and that makes you more badass than a lot of video game characters.

(via rhiorhino)

5PM
rifa:

therandominmyhead:

A wild MACHAMP appeared!
Go! DUGTRIO!

I tried to scroll past this but its too damn clever

rifa:

therandominmyhead:

A wild MACHAMP appeared!

Go! DUGTRIO!

I tried to scroll past this but its too damn clever

(via rhiorhino)

5PM

These past five days of owning a dog have taught me many things.

Mainly that I want to be my dog.

5PM
pleatedjeans:

via

"why wudan?  ….why?"

pleatedjeans:

via

"why wudan?  ….why?"

(via leviathanwithwhiskers)

4PM

lettuceiscurrentlyinmyasshole:

California 10-day waiting period to buy gun violates the Second Amendment

dynastylnoire:

So are not going to discuss why it is so important to have a gun ASAP and why it might be a good if not great thing for people purchasing a gun with intent to do harm to wait?

I bet the same people who think a waiting period to buy a gun violates their rights support a waiting period to get an abortion.

well yea.  gotta think long and hard before killing a fetus.  but killing a born, sentient person?

https://warosu.org/data/tg/img/0329/76/1403813331083.gif

(Source: thinksquad)

4PM
sparklesmccheesy:

ittygittydiddynator:

iheichouguys:

lifehackable:

This is potentially life saving information everyone should know.

No you guys this post helped me find my cat. He was missing for almost a month and I’ve had him for over 12 years. After seeing this I put his favorite blanket he always slept on outside hoping he would smell mine or his scent and he was back the next fucking day asleep on it.

When my cat got out, we called and called for him, and then, later that night, I remembered similar advice to this, and so put his little scratching pad, which he adores, on the front porch. Not even half an hour later, I heard a thump, opened the door, and there was his big butt, meowing at me.

Important and vital

sparklesmccheesy:

ittygittydiddynator:

iheichouguys:

lifehackable:

This is potentially life saving information everyone should know.

No you guys this post helped me find my cat. He was missing for almost a month and I’ve had him for over 12 years. After seeing this I put his favorite blanket he always slept on outside hoping he would smell mine or his scent and he was back the next fucking day asleep on it.

When my cat got out, we called and called for him, and then, later that night, I remembered similar advice to this, and so put his little scratching pad, which he adores, on the front porch. Not even half an hour later, I heard a thump, opened the door, and there was his big butt, meowing at me.

Important and vital

(via lettuceiscurrentlyinmyasshole)

4PM

I’m not a misandrist, but have you ever noticed how all men except Bill Nye and Neil deGrasse Tyson are completely useless?

3PM

sneakyfeets:

And another thing, the Texas Chainsaw Massacre bugs me like

This is Texas

Why did no one shoot him

My understanding of Texas is that you can shake a tree and 4 pistols and a shotgun will fall out, look at the ground there’s a gun look up towards the sky there’s a gun. Your shoes? Guns. Your clothes? Ammo for the gun

Why did no one shoot him

(via iconickomodo)

1PM
neurosciencestuff:

Our brains judge a face’s trustworthiness - Even when we can’t see it
Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others.
“Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face’s trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived,” explains Jonathan Freeman, an assistant professor in New York University’s Department of Psychology and the study’s senior author.
“The results are consistent with an extensive body of research suggesting that we form spontaneous judgments of other people that can be largely outside awareness,” adds Freeman, who conducted the study as a faculty member at Dartmouth College.
The study’s other authors included Ryan Stolier, an NYU doctoral candidate, Zachary Ingbretsen, a research scientist who previously worked with Freeman and is now at Harvard University, and Eric Hehman, a post-doctoral researcher at NYU.
The researchers focused on the workings of the brain’s amygdala, a structure that is important for humans’ social and emotional behavior. Previous studies have shown this structure to be active in judging the trustworthiness of faces. However, it had not been known if the amygdala is capable of responding to a complex social signal like a face’s trustworthiness without that signal reaching perceptual awareness.
To gauge this part of the brain’s role in making such assessments, the study’s authors conducted a pair of experiments in which they monitored the activity of subjects’ amygdala while the subjects were exposed to a series of facial images.
These images included both standardized photographs of actual strangers’ faces as well as artificially generated faces whose trustworthiness cues could be manipulated while all other facial cues were controlled. The artificially generated faces were computer synthesized based on previous research showing that cues such as higher inner eyebrows and pronounced cheekbones are seen as trustworthy and lower inner eyebrows and shallower cheekbones are seen as untrustworthy.
Prior to the start of these experiments, a separate group of subjects examined all the real and computer-generated faces and rated how trustworthy or untrustworthy they appeared. As previous studies have shown, subjects strongly agreed on the level of trustworthiness conveyed by each given face.
In the experiments, a new set of subjects viewed these same faces inside a brain scanner, but were exposed to the faces very briefly—for only a matter of milliseconds. This rapid exposure, together with another feature known as “backward masking,” prevented subjects from consciously seeing the faces. Backward masking works by presenting subjects with an irrelevant “mask” image that immediately follows an extremely brief exposure to a face, which is thought to terminate the brain’s ability to further process the face and prevent it from reaching awareness. In the first experiment, the researchers examined amygdala activity in response to three levels of a face’s trustworthiness: low, medium, and high. In the second experiment, they assessed amygdala activity in response to a fully continuous spectrum of trustworthiness.
Across the two experiments, the researchers found that specific regions inside the amygdala exhibited activity tracking how untrustworthy a face appeared, and other regions inside the amygdala exhibited activity tracking the overall strength of the trustworthiness signal (whether untrustworthy or trustworthy)—even though subjects could not consciously see any of the faces.
“These findings provide evidence that the amygdala’s processing of social cues in the absence of awareness may be more extensive than previously understood,” observes Freeman. “The amygdala is able to assess how trustworthy another person’s face appears without it being consciously perceived.”

neurosciencestuff:

Our brains judge a face’s trustworthiness - Even when we can’t see it

Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others.

“Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face’s trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived,” explains Jonathan Freeman, an assistant professor in New York University’s Department of Psychology and the study’s senior author.

“The results are consistent with an extensive body of research suggesting that we form spontaneous judgments of other people that can be largely outside awareness,” adds Freeman, who conducted the study as a faculty member at Dartmouth College.

The study’s other authors included Ryan Stolier, an NYU doctoral candidate, Zachary Ingbretsen, a research scientist who previously worked with Freeman and is now at Harvard University, and Eric Hehman, a post-doctoral researcher at NYU.

The researchers focused on the workings of the brain’s amygdala, a structure that is important for humans’ social and emotional behavior. Previous studies have shown this structure to be active in judging the trustworthiness of faces. However, it had not been known if the amygdala is capable of responding to a complex social signal like a face’s trustworthiness without that signal reaching perceptual awareness.

To gauge this part of the brain’s role in making such assessments, the study’s authors conducted a pair of experiments in which they monitored the activity of subjects’ amygdala while the subjects were exposed to a series of facial images.

These images included both standardized photographs of actual strangers’ faces as well as artificially generated faces whose trustworthiness cues could be manipulated while all other facial cues were controlled. The artificially generated faces were computer synthesized based on previous research showing that cues such as higher inner eyebrows and pronounced cheekbones are seen as trustworthy and lower inner eyebrows and shallower cheekbones are seen as untrustworthy.

Prior to the start of these experiments, a separate group of subjects examined all the real and computer-generated faces and rated how trustworthy or untrustworthy they appeared. As previous studies have shown, subjects strongly agreed on the level of trustworthiness conveyed by each given face.

In the experiments, a new set of subjects viewed these same faces inside a brain scanner, but were exposed to the faces very briefly—for only a matter of milliseconds. This rapid exposure, together with another feature known as “backward masking,” prevented subjects from consciously seeing the faces. Backward masking works by presenting subjects with an irrelevant “mask” image that immediately follows an extremely brief exposure to a face, which is thought to terminate the brain’s ability to further process the face and prevent it from reaching awareness. In the first experiment, the researchers examined amygdala activity in response to three levels of a face’s trustworthiness: low, medium, and high. In the second experiment, they assessed amygdala activity in response to a fully continuous spectrum of trustworthiness.

Across the two experiments, the researchers found that specific regions inside the amygdala exhibited activity tracking how untrustworthy a face appeared, and other regions inside the amygdala exhibited activity tracking the overall strength of the trustworthiness signal (whether untrustworthy or trustworthy)—even though subjects could not consciously see any of the faces.

“These findings provide evidence that the amygdala’s processing of social cues in the absence of awareness may be more extensive than previously understood,” observes Freeman. “The amygdala is able to assess how trustworthy another person’s face appears without it being consciously perceived.”

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